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Friday, 25 August 2017

Mr Darcy's Brides by Regina Jeffers - Guest Post, Excerpt and Giveaway

Book Cover: Mr Darcy's Brides by Regina Jeffers
I'm welcoming Regina Jeffers back to Babblings of a Bookworm today. Regina has a new book out, called Mr Darcy's Brides. That plural is intriguing isn't it?! As you will know, Regina does a lot of research in relation to the Regency period and today she has a post regarding marriage in Scotland during this time. She's also treating us to an excerpt of the book, and is kindly giving away an ebook of Mr Darcy's Brideto two lucky commenters here. I'll now hand over to Regina.

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Scottish Marriages During the Regency

Those of us who read and write Regency novels have all heard of elopements to Gretna Green. Harking back to 1754 and the introduction of a new controversial Marriage Act in England, Gretna Green flourished as a haven for runaway couples. It even receives mentions in not just 1 but amazingly 3 of Jane Austen novels, Pride & Prejudice, Sense & Sensibility and Mansfield Park.
"MY DEAR HARRIET,
You will laugh when you know where I am gone, and I cannot help laughing myself at your surprise to-morrow morning, as soon as I am missed. I am going to Gretna Green, and if you cannot guess with who, I shall think you a simpleton, for there is but one man in the world I love, and he is an angel.”
- Lydia Bennet in Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 47
From Austenonly, we learn, “References to Scotland in Jane Austen’s adult works are few, but she did  make use of the different marriage laws in Scotland in three of her novels: Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice and Mansfield Park. In Sense and Sensibility, Colonel Brandon had planned to elope to Gretna with his poor Eliza but was thwarted at the last minute by the folly of her maid exposing their plans. In Pride and Prejudice Wickham planned to elope with Georgiana Darcy to Gretna Green, but his dastardly plan was foiled by Georgiana’s confession to Darcy before they could set out on the road. Quite typically he had no such plans to take Lydia Bennet there, though she was initially under the misapprehension that Gretna was to be their final destination. In Mansfield Park, Julia Bertram and Mr Yates run off to Gretna to be married amid the turmoil of the adulterous goings on between Maria Rushworth and Mr Crawford.

Clandestine marrage
“Why Gretna Green? Gretna, or Scotland as Jane Austen mostly wrote when she used the term in her novels, was, in the late 18th Century a place where couples thwarted in their plans to marry legally in England and Wales could resort, in order to marry legally without parental consent. From the implementation of the Clandestine Marriages Act of 1753, it was impossible for anyone under the age of 21 years age to legally marry without their parents ( or guardians) consent.”

We must remember that Scotland is approximately 320 miles from London. The main thoroughfare from London to Edinburgh followed the Great North Road or a series of turnpike roads on the western side of the country. The journey was not an easy one. The average carriage travelled between 5-7 miles per hour––that is not accounting for poor weather, tolls, meals, changing out the horses, etc. Even traveling 12 hours per day, it would take a couple some 4 days to reach Scotland, more than likely 5 days. Do not forget that many times irate family members were in hot pursuit.

But Gretna Green was not the only place for elopements in Scotland. The Great North Road took couples to Scotland via Northumberland. Lamberton, Berwickshire, Scotland, for example, is 4 miles north of Berwick-upon-Tweed in Northumberland. The now demolished Old Toll House at Lamberton, situated just across the border in Scotland, was notorious for its irregular marriages. From 1798 to 1858 keepers of the Toll, as well as questionable men-of-the-cloth, married couples in a hurry to escape relations.

Paxton, Berwickshire, Scotland, lies 1 mile west of the border with Northumberland, Berwick-upon-Tweed. Mordington, another Scottish village, was 5 miles from Northumberland. It is said that many chose to be married by the toll keepers of these two border towns.

Sometimes the couple chose to cross the Coldstream Bridge, which links Cornhill-on-Tweed, Northumberland, to Coldstream, a civil parish in the Scottish Borders area of Scotland. Much like Gretna Green, it was a popular centre for runaway marriages. As with the other towns mentioned, couples were joined in marriage at the toll house.

To Bind
Who performed these marriages? The simple answer is: anyone who wanted to do so. Declaring one’s vows to live together before witnesses could constitute a binding marriage. One did not require a clergyman to be deemed a wedded couple. These ceremonies would also provide a certificate as proof of the marriage, for when the couple returned home.

Irregular Scottish marriages simply required the couple’s agreement and witnesses to the act to be legal. A couple could publicly promise to abide in marriage, which could be followed by consummation as proof or simply by cohabitation with repute. Any citizen could witness a public promise. The idea of “marrying over the anvil” in the legend of Gretna Green came about by the blacksmith being one of the first building encountered by the couple seeking a Scottish marriage in the village, and the blacksmith was a “citizen.” A marriage of “cohabitation with repute” was an old style of common-law marriage.

Introducing MR. DARCY’S BRIDEs

I much prefer the sharpest criticism of a single intelligent man to the thoughtless approval of the masses.


Book Cover: Mr Darcy's Brides by Regina Jeffers
ELIZABETH BENNET is determined that she will put a stop to her mother’s plans to marry off the eldest Bennet daughter to Mr. Collins, the Longbourn heir, but a man that Mr. Bennet considers an annoying dimwit. Hence, Elizabeth disguises herself as Jane and repeats her vows to the supercilious rector as if she is her sister, thereby voiding the nuptials and saving Jane from a life of drudgery. Yet, even the “best laid plans” can often go awry.

FITZWILLIAM DARCY is desperate to find a woman who will assist him in leading his sister back to Society after Georgiana’s failed elopement with Darcy’s old enemy George Wickham. He is so desperate that he agrees to Lady Catherine De Bourgh’s suggestion that Darcy marry her ladyship’s “sickly” daughter Anne. Unfortunately, as he waits for his bride to join him at the altar, he realizes he has made a terrible error in judgement, but there is no means to right the wrong without ruining his cousin’s reputation. Yet, even as he weighs his options, the touch of “Anne’s” hand upon his sends an unusual “zing” of awareness shooting up Darcy’s arm. It is only when he realizes the “zing” has arrived at the hand of a stranger, who has disrupted his nuptials, that he breathes both a sigh of relief and a groan of frustration, for the question remains: Is Darcy’s marriage to the woman legal?

What if Fitzwilliam Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet met under different circumstances than those we know from Jane Austen’s classic tale: Circumstances that did not include the voices of vanity and pride and prejudice and doubt that we find in the original story? Their road to happily ever after may not, even then, be an easy one, but with the expectations of others removed from their relationship, can they learn to trust each other long enough to carve out a path to true happiness?

Excerpt from Chapter 11 of MR. DARCY’S BRIDEs.

Darcy handed her down from the let carriage before a small inn. They were a little less than three hours removed from Allard’s estate, but he had noticed how with each mile of the journey,

Elizabeth’s shoulders had relaxed a bit more.

Their return to the manor house had been executed in relative silence. As he walked beside her, Darcy’s mind had reviewed all his interactions with Allard and how he had failed to notice the weaknesses in the man’s business aplomb before arriving on the man’s threshold. Thankfully, Elizabeth had not attempted to tease or cajole him from his self-chastisements. She was not that kind of woman, one who chattered on, filling the air with nonsense. No. Elizabeth Bennet was a woman who used language as she did every other facet of her life, with a combination of intelligence and economy.

It was only when the manor came into view that she offered, “I must beg your pardon, Mr. Darcy, for I have again interfered in your well-structured life.”

He halted their progress and turned her to him. “I consider your presence in my life a blessing, and you are not to think otherwise. You have prevented me from making two monumental mistakes. How can you think me from sorts?”

She searched for the sincerity in his expression for several elongated seconds before the worry set her features transformed into a smile that had Darcy’s heart skipping a beat. “Shall that be my role in your life, Mr. Darcy? Savior?” Good humor filled her tease, and he found himself smiling in return.

“My personal guardian angel,” he said softly as he brought her gloved hand to his lips, where he kissed the inside of her wrist.

A flush of color raced to her cheeks, but she did not rip her hand from his grasp. Instead, with a delightful laugh, one that had a rush of warmth filling his abdomen, she taunted, “Mrs. Bennet will testify that I am more devil than angel, and you, sir, would do well to remember as such.”

“May I be of assistance, sir?” The innkeeper rushed forward to greet them.

Darcy tucked Elizabeth closer to his side. “My cousin and I require rooms,” he announced. They had agreed that as they traveled in the direction of the Flynns’ estate that it was probable that they would encounter others from Flynn’s household, who might recognize Elizabeth, and so she was now Darcy’s relation instead of his wife. He would go to extremes to protect Elizabeth’s reputation, for he had grown truly fond of her.

The innkeeper eyed them suspiciously. “Not many of your ilk come this way.”

Darcy understood the man’s insinuation. “My cousin and I were guests at the Allard estate outside of Edinburgh, but measles have struck some of those employed upon the estate. We thought it best to depart early before the illness spreads to those in the main house.” He told the truth—just not the complete truth.

“Measles, heh?” the man asked as he turned the register so Darcy might sign it. “That be a bad business.” He handed Darcy the pen, but did not place the ink well upon the table. “Before ye be signing, sir, ye shud know there be a weddin’ occurrin’ here this evening. Not exactly the weddin’, more along the lines of the celebration. There be no assembly hall or meeting place large enough to hold the sizable family gathering. Most in the area call in here regularly. Might’n be a bit loud.”

Darcy did not wish to climb back into the crowded let carriage with Sheffield and Hannah observing his every interaction with Elizabeth, but he dutifully asked, “And the next decent inn?”

“For the likes of you, sir, some twelve miles along the main road south.”

Darcy leaned down to ask, “What say you, Elizabeth?”

“In truth,” she said softly, “I could sleep through the roughest storm God chose to deliver.  A few partiers will not disturb me. A good meal and a bath are all I require for the evening.”

“Then we will stay.” He grinned at her. “You heard the lady. Two rooms as far removed from the jubilation as possible.”

Within a quarter hour, they dined in the common room of the inn. Only three others occupied the room, so they were relatively alone and could speak freely. “I wish to extend my apologies,” he said in serious tones. “I thought myself in charge of what has occurred between us since you ran from the church, but I fear I have done you irreparable harm. I have placed you in a abrasive surrounding and opened you to further accusations. You must permit me to do more than present your sisters with a larger dowry.”

She looked up in alarm. “Such as?”

“I would not be opposed to our joining,” he stated honestly. Since taking her acquaintance, Darcy had often considered the possibility of calling her wife.

Elizabeth shook off the idea. “I could not entertain your address, Mr. Darcy. Even if you had not brought me aboard your yacht, my actions at the church discredited my name. It was foolish of me to think such cheekiness could be ignored. Even if I had simply thwarted Mr. Collins’s plans, I named my fate. I doubt either the gentleman or your aunt would have remained silent regarding my purposeful slight. And I find it hard to believe that my father will be capable of controlling Mrs. Bennet’s aspersions. He has failed miserably in the past when Mrs. Bennet sets her mind to such misery. Most certainly, all in the neighborhood know something of my ill-advised bravado by now.”

He did not approve of her decision, but Darcy nodded his agreement. “I must abide by your choice.”

Silence settled between them, and it was not the kind of silence that caused distress. It was more of the manner in which two friends can sit together, even when they disagree upon something important. He searched for a means to change her mind, but he knew Elizabeth adamant in her opinions. Before he could form an argument to persuade her, the wedding party, literally, carried the newly-wed couple into the inn. The bride and the groom were perched on the shoulders of four bulky Scotsmen, who proudly hefted the pair higher, to the cheers of all those trailing behind them.

“Oh,” Elizabeth sighed heavily as she looked on. “Is she not beautiful? Such joy upon her countenance. Do you suppose they are in love?”

Darcy studied the pair as their escorts set them upon the floor. “The groom appears enthralled with his bride.” He noted the look of longing upon Elizabeth’s face, and he felt a bit sad that because of him, she would never know such happiness. “Is that your desire? To marry for love?” Such would go a long way in explaining why she had refused him, for Darcy knew her affections had not been stirred by their acquaintance.

She shrugged off his questions. “Do you find it odd, Mr. Darcy, that I am as susceptible to the idea of discovering a man who holds me in deep regard as are my sisters? Is it not foolish for a woman of my years to carry the wish of the Cinder Maid buried deep in her heart?”

“My parents married for love,” he admitted. “Together, they were a force with which to be reckoned.” Darcy chuckled in remembrance. “They were quite remarkable. I always believed if I could replicate their devotion to each other in my own marriage that Pemberley could survive and prosper.”

“Then when did you have a change of heart?” she challenged. “From your own lips, Miss De Bourgh did not claim your heart.”

“I do not know exactly how to define that particular moment.” He sat staring out the window over her shoulder. “I thought I had several years before I must choose a wife. Thought myself above entering the marriage mart. But...” He closed his eyes to drive away the taste of bile rising to his throat whenever he considered the betrayal practiced at George Wickham’s hands.

“But?” Elizabeth prompted, as she slipped her hand into his. “Know that I can serve as your confidante, Mr. Darcy.”

He opened his eyes to study her beautiful countenance. How was it possible that they had known each other less than a fortnight; yet, she was essential to all that he held most dear? “But a former friend used our relationship to attempt a seduction of my sister.” He had said the words aloud, and all his fears of the world swinging away from its axis had proved false. “I blundered—not giving her the attention she required,” he explained, “and Georgiana is so broken that I am desperate to restore her good humor. I thought that Anne might prove a comforting force for Miss Darcy. Mayhap even lead my sister to a better understanding of Georgiana’s lack of fault in the matter.”

Tears pooled in Elizabeth’s eyes. “And who is to lead you to a better understanding of your role in the matter, Mr. Darcy?” she asked in sympathetic tones.

He squeezed her hand. “My fault will never be obliterated. It is Georgiana’s heart that requires protection. She is not yet sixteen and was easily misled by a man she recognized as part of our family’s legacy. Miss Darcy trusted him, but all Mr. Wickham, who was my childhood chum and the son of my father’s steward, wished was my sister’s substantial dowry.”

“Oh, William,” she whispered. “You cannot take the blame for some blackguard’s disposition. You can only execute your life with honor.” She smiled weakly. “I know young girls. I was one very recently.” A bit of a tease entered her tone. “We give our hearts away many times before we discover a man worth knowing.”

“Pardon, friends,” the innkeeper said as he set two steaming plates before them. “Wanted to get yer meal out before the celebration became too rowdy.” He chuckled good-naturedly as he glanced over his shoulder at the wedding party. “The bride be the daughter of Sir James Metts, a knight who earned his title via our local bishop. She be a good girl. Don’t know much of the groom. He be Greek. And Catholic. Never knew a Greek before. Some sort of diplomat, I hears. They met in London at a musicale, whatever that may be.” He set two tea cups upon the table without saucers. “Don’t know ‘bout the spirits, but the young man claims this a traditional drink for those of his kind. Says it tastes of aniseed or fennel. Wishes you to join him in a toast to his bride.” The innkeeper poured two fingers full in the cups.

Elizabeth eyed the drink suspiciously. “And what does the gentleman call these spirits?”

“Ouzo.”

She glanced to Darcy. “Are you familiar with the drink?”

“It may surprise you, my dear,” he said with a genuine smile, “but I never experienced a grand tour nor do I associate with high rollers.”

Her mouth formed a teasing pout. “Then I suppose it falls to me to taste the brew first. I would not wish to stain your immaculate reputation by demanding that you imbibe first.”

Darcy’s smile widened. “We will partake of the brew together.” He lifted his cup to tap it gently against hers. “To life.”

“To love,” she added.

Then they turned as one toward the happy couple, and with the others gathered in the room, they declared, “To a happy marriage.”

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About the Author

Author Regina Jeffers
Regina Jeffers, a public classroom teacher for thirty-nine years, considers herself a Jane Austen enthusiast. She is the author of several Austen-inspired novels, including Darcy's Passions, Darcy's Temptation, Vampire Darcy's Desire, Captain Wentworth's Persuasion, The Phantom of Pemberley, Christmas at Pemberley, The Disappearance of Georgiana Darcy, Honor and Hope, and The Mysterious Death of Mr. Darcy. She also writes Regency romances: The Scandal of Lady Eleanor, A Touch of Velvet, A Touch of Cashémere, A Touch of Grace, A Touch of Mercy, A Touch of Love, and The First Wives' Club. A Time Warner Star Teacher and Martha Holden Jennings Scholar, Jeffers often serves as a consultant in language arts and media literacy. Currently living outside Charlotte, North Carolina, she spends her time with her writing, gardening, and her adorable grandchildren. 



Giveaway Time!

Book Cover: Mr Darcy's Brides by Regina Jeffers
Regina has two eBook copies of MR. DARCY’S BRIDEs available to those who comment below. The giveaway will end at the end of Monday 28 August 2017 and is open internationally. Don't forget to leave a way for me to contact you in case you are one of the lucky winners.


Citations for the images

Old Toll House, Lamberton, Scotland in 1890 http://tour-scotland-photographs.blogspot.com/2014/10/old-photograph-toll-house-lamberton.html

Marriage and Toll House at Coldstream Bridge on the Scottish side of the border https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marriage_in_Scotland

52 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing your historical research with us, Regina. I love history and don't find it boring. It taught me to appreciate what had happened before and learn lessons so as not to repeat the bad things. The accompanying illustrations are lovely. And thanks too for the giveaway.

    evangelineace2020(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. Thanks for following me over here, Sylvia. Scottish marriages added a different element into what was and was not legal in Regency England.

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    2. Hi Luthien. I really enjoy historical posts when authors like Regina are kind enough to come here and share them. I can't see me reading a whole history book, but a blog post is just about the right length for me.

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  2. Have travelled from Scotland to London and back quite a few times, it still sometimes felt like it took 4 days

    meikleblog(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. I always laugh in a book set in the Regency when the author has the couple leaving London and being in Scotland within two days. I always figure about 7 MPH for a coach when I am writing a book.

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    2. Hi Vesper. I've only been to Scotland once and it took about 7 hours by road, I think, and that is obviously on motorways and considerably quicker than it would have been by horse and carriage!

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  3. Comparing elopements then and elopements now makes me wonder at where exactly it didn't become a big deal anymore. Back then, you didn't even have to get to Gretna Green. Just having gone with the man anywhere, alone, was a sure way to be forced to marry anyway hahaha, based on the little I've read

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    1. Hi Laurie May. I don't know whether the shame for the family would be worse for an elopement, or for a compromise. At least with an elopement which led to a marriage, the solution was swiftly reached.

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  4. Being compromised by the gentleman would require a lady to marry (as was with Wickham and Lydia), Laurie.

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  5. I love the line 'I would not be opposed to our joining' poor Darcy is obviously not at the stage of loving Elizabeth to distraction YET!
    I enjoyed the Scottish marriage information. Especially that it didn't have to be presided over by a blacksmith, and that they only had to say that they wished to be married to each other!! Obviously a cheaper option than today.
    Thanks Regina for the information and excerpt and Ceri for hosting the giveaway.
    glyniswhitelegg (at) gmail (dot) com

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    1. It was also easier to earn a divorce in Scotland, Glynis.
      Darcy and Elizabeth are still learning something of each other at this point in the story. As marriage for those of Society was often more of a business arrangement than for love, Darcy has yet to hold Elizabeth in deep affection, but he is thinking that if he were to marry that she would be a good match.

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    2. Hi Glynis, I learned things from this post too. I always wondered why the blacksmith presided over the weddings!

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  6. I love all of Regina's books. Looks like this one will be just as good if not better. Can't wait to get my hands on it. Congratulations, Regina on another published book! shughes@saintagnes.com

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    1. Many thanks, Sarah. It has been a good while since we connected on the internet. I think you will love this one.

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    2. Hi Sarah. This one has such a great premise for a story. I hope you enjoy the book when you read it :)

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  7. Wonderful excerpt, Regina! I admire your writing and your dedication to research so very much. Congratulations on your newest book, and thanks for the chance to win a copy!

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    1. I am glad you enjoyed it, Pam. The book is doing very well.

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    2. Hi Pamela. I always appreciate it when an author does research, because it means that we as readers can learn something while being entertained!

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  8. How about that, any one could perform the marriage. Yikes! Loved the Gretna Green information and this chapter with the "Ouzo" since it leads to another wedding. Ha ha! Thanks for featuring Regina here. Since I already have her book, no need to include me in the drawing. Great tale!

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    1. Handfasting is considered a "pagan" wedding in these times, but it was acceptable in Scotland as a "clandestine" wedding (like a common law marriage in modern times). Such little quirks makes a story more interesting.

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    2. Thanks for commenting, Jen!

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  9. Wonderful excerpt! I love your books, Regina, and I am sure I will love this new one too! Thank you for the giveaway!
    danielaquadros@gmail.com

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    1. I am glad you decided to follow me over here, Daniela.

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    2. Hi there Daniela. I hope you enjoy the book when you read it. Thanks for stopping by!

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  10. Oh what fun. That excerpt just tugs at the heart. Ceri, thanks for hosting today. Regina... I peaked over at Amazon and you are running 88% 5-stars, the rest were 4-stars... nothing lower. Way to go!!! You have a winner on your hands. Congratulations on the success so far. Blessing on the rest of your blog tour. I look forward to reading this. I have been stalking you on this tour. I'm harmless... I promise. Enjoy!!

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    1. Ooops...

      jwgarrett13@hotmail.com

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    2. I try not to look at reviews, Jeanne. Thanks for the update. LOL!

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    3. Hi Jeanne, thanks for dropping by and for following the tour!

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  11. This has proven to be one of the best books Regina has written. I have it so don't put me in the giveaway. I have to add that Regina is one of my favorite authors and reading her books make me aspire to be a better writer.

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    1. I could say the same of you, Brenda. With all the JAFF out there, I stick close to those tried and true authors in my reading choices.

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    2. That's such wonderful praise Brenda, thank you for commenting!

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  12. Thank you for the information on Scottish marriages -- it certainly was eye-opening.

    The excerpt from "Mr. Darcy's Brides was intriguing, as was the idea of Lizzy disguising herself as Jane to invalidate a marriage to the deplorable Mr. Collins. And I take it she does this with Anne De Bough as well? Dying to know.

    Please enter me into the giveaway. flo123(at)usa(dot)com

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    1. Anne oversleeps (from one of draughts) and does not show for her wedding to Darcy; therefore, the heavily veiled Elizabeth can slip into Anne's place.

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    2. I agree, I'd never have thought up this as a starting premise for a story, but it's very intruiging!

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  13. I am so very intrigued by the plot. Elizabeth is such a good sister to foil her marriage to Mr. Collins,, but how did she end up with Darcy? The information of marriage in Scotland was interesting and answers many questions. Thank you for the excerpt and giveaway. evamedmonds(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Check out chapter 1 on Austen Authors, Eva. It is under the tab called "The Writer's Block." It will answer many of your questions.

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    2. Glad you enjoyed the post, Eva. Good luck in the giveaway!

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  14. I love the excerpt and sharing your research. I love the research you have shared in the blog posts. Please do not enter me as I already have the ebook.

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    1. Thank you for your patronage, Deborah. I appreciate the kindness of the JAFF community.

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    2. Thanks for commenting, Debbie. I always enjoy Regina's historical posts too. I hope you are recovering well :)

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  15. loved the history of the wedding which I knew most of, and the excerpt was wonderful

    denise

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    1. Although you follow me around, Denise (a fact for which I am thankful), I do tend to repeat myself at times. Scottish weddings were also part of A Dance with Mr. Darcy.

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    2. Hi Denise. Glad you enjoyed the excerpt.

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  16. Always love learning about Regency history! Looking forward to reading your latest release! Thanks for the giveaway. tdungnvu (at) yahoo (dot) com

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    1. I am so pleased you joined us today, Dung.

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    2. Thanks for stopping by and good luck in the giveaway, Dung!

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  17. Regina,
    Such an interesting premise! I'm so looking forward to reading this one!
    Loved the excerpt!
    Cheers for such an informative post!

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    1. I am first and foremost a history geek, Mary. I love working little tidbits into my stories.

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    2. So glad you enjoyed the post, Mary, and I hope you enjoy the book when you read it :)

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  18. I've posted the winners of this giveaway here: http://babblingsofabookworm.blogspot.co.uk/2017/08/winners-of-mr-darcys-brides-by-regina.html

    I don't have contact details for one of the winners, so please contact me!

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  19. Congrats to the winners and thanks for this great post, Ceri and Regina!

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  20. Congratulations to the winners. This is one I want to read.

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